My story is now available

Hi everyone!

I’m honored to declare that my short horror story is now available on TeleportMagazine. I invite you to visit the website and enjoy reading it.

Also I’ll appreciate your comments and reviews on the Teleport Magazine and here.

Truly Yours

Amir.H. Ghazi

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10 Common Nightmares

1.Falling from Great Heights

This kind of nightmare has happened to people whose anxiety is linked (or believed to be) to the feeling that they are not in command of their own life or even themselves. This can be caused by the person’s work, intimate relationships, money, etc. After all, the feeling of rapidly falling from height towards a certain death clearly represents the lack of freedom and/or power.

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2.Injuries or Malformation

Anyone seen Vanilla Sky? Dreams that you have an accident or you simply wake up with a horrible scar or deformities are quite common in patients. This case tends to represent the feeling of weakness or powerlessness in a person’s life. The dream is urging them to build on self-esteem and trust themselves in a way.

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3.Natural Catastrophes

People usually find themselves trying to run away from a sudden tsunami, an enormous tornado or a volcano that has just erupted. These, again, are generally understood in the scientific community as revealing a feeling of anxiety and fear. Meteorological events are highly unpredictable and we find ourselves impotent and insignificant in front of the enormous powers of nature.

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4.Being Trapped

These nightmares are particularly common in people suffering from claustrophobia—the fear (sometimes extreme) of being locked up in a small area without the possibility of escaping. However, they can also be experienced by people, fearing their inability to break away from their current bad situations like annoying relationship or dead end job. People that are going through a difficult financial situation are also prone to have these nightmares.

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5.Teeth Dropping

This might not be so frequent, yet some people describe it as a profoundly anxious experience filled with a tremendous anguish. In the dream, the person starts feeling their teeth dropping suddenly from their mouth or generally surrounded by other people. This nightmare has been linked to profoundly personal worries about other people’s judgments on his physical appearance.

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6.Being Naked

This is a common childhood dream we may have experienced. We may also remember how deeply stressful the experience was. You may dream about trying to hide without the possibility and other people laughing at you. Psychologists argue these dreams are a symptom of an inner fear of what other people might believe or say about us, particularly about our physical appearance, although the fact of being naked can also be perfectly seen as an allegory.

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7.Seeing the Dead People

Many people have dreamt about seeing dead people. Most of the times patients dream they see people who they are familiar with and are now dead rather than the dead people they have never met. This can be seen as a representation of our fear of the unknown. If you see close people you have lost, like your grandmother, the nightmare is probably a projection of your inability to let that person go.

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8.Missing Important Events

Ever dreamt about waking up (what an irony, isn’t it?) and realizing you have missed a very important date? It’s quite a common dream, too. Some people even dream they have missed their own wedding. These dreams represent the fears and anxieties that arise due to outside pressure and expectation on us. We may be excellent and perform great always, but these dreams often warn us that maybe we are anxious and negative inside.

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9.Partner Leaving

These might be one of the worst nightmares we can experience, and also work as an alarm mechanism, keeping us attentive and precautious. These dreams represent one of the deeper human fears: the feeling of abandonment. After all, isn’t it the worst thing that could happen to a person? That fear remains in a person since childhood, latent yet very powerful. They can also arise because of insecurities, the feeling we are not good enough for our partner.

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10.Being Attacked

This is the most common nightmare of all. Many of us find ourselves being chased off by people with
guns or knives, dangerous animals, etc. This kind of dreams generally indicates that you have a difficulty in confronting something in your daily lives, or you may even want to run away from it. The strategy you choose to escape can also be significant, this is, whether you are running away or rather decide to hide in fear.

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Now what’s your own nightmare? Tell me in comment section

Source: http://www.enkivillage.com/nightmare-meanings.html

“End Of Watch” by Stephen King


Description

In Room 217 of the Lakes Region Traumatic Brain Injury Clinic, something has awakened. Something evil. Brady Hartsfield, perpetrator of the Mercedes Massacre, where eight people were killed and many more were badly injured, has been in the clinic for five years, in a vegetative state. According to his doctors, anything approaching a complete recovery is unlikely. But behind the drool and stare, Brady is awake, and in possession of deadly new powers that allow him to wreak unimaginable havoc without ever leaving his hospital room. 

Retired police detective Bill Hodges, the unlikely hero of Mr. Mercedes and Finders Keepers, now runs an investigation agency with his partner, Holly Gibney—the woman who delivered the blow to Hartsfield’s head that put him on the brain injury ward. When Bill and Holly are called to a suicide scene with ties to the Mercedes Massacre, they find themselves pulled into their most dangerous case yet, one that will put their lives at risk, as well as those of Bill’s heroic young friend Jerome Robinson and his teenage sister, Barbara. Brady Hartsfield is back, and planning revenge not just on Hodges and his friends, but on an entire city. 

What does your dreamy writing place look like?

As a fan of scary books and an enthusiast horror writer, I like my dreamy writing place to be this way:

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I like writing in a small room with a window which opens to a dark, foggy forest with broken trees and dark green tussocks. I want the room to be on the second floor of an old, wooden hug. I prefer the window to be open when I’m writing or reading under the gray, dim light. Also like the cold wind gusts through the window, papers and my hairs. The bookshelf must be in front of my bed, beside the writing desk.
And finally the most important part, an IR (interested reader). What’s an IR person? It can be anyone, your best friend, a member of your family or your husband/wife. A person who reads your manuscripts and criticizes your writing. A person whose critics come from deep in his/her heart and they are important and constructive for you. This loved person for me is my future lovely wife who stands beside me through days and nights, honest and true. But is there any girl who be brave enough to live in such horrible place with a mad writer like me?!!

I’m not sure:)

NOW WHAT’S YOUR DREAMY WIRING PLACE? Can’t wait to read about yours!

Amir.H.Ghazi

The Black House

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Twenty years ago, a boy named Jack Sawyer travelled to a parallel universe called The Territories to save his mother and her Territories “twinner” from a premature and agonizing death that would have brought cataclysm to the other world. Now Jack is a retired Los Angeles homicide detective living in the nearly nonexistent hamlet of Tamarack, WI. He has no recollection of his adventures in the Territories and was compelled to leave the police force when an odd, happenstance event threatened to awaken those memories.

When a series of gruesome murders occur in western Wisconsin that are reminiscent of those committed several decades earlier by a real-life madman named Albert Fish, the killer is dubbed “The Fisherman” and Jack’s buddy, the local chief of police, begs Jack to help his inexperienced force find him. But is this merely the work of a disturbed individual, or has a mysterious and malignant force been unleashed in this quiet town? What causes Jack’s inexplicable waking dreams, if that is what they are, of robins’ eggs and red feathers? It’s almost as if someone is trying to tell him something. As that message becomes increasingly impossible to ignore, Jack is drawn back to the Territories and to his own hidden past, where he may find the soul-strength to enter a terrifying house at the end of a deserted track of forest, there to encounter the obscene and ferocious evils sheltered within it.

Amir.H.Ghazi

History of Horror Stories

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horror story, a story in which the focus is on creating a feeling of fear. Such tales are of ancient origin and form a substantial part of the body of folk literature. They can feature supernatural elements such as ghosts, witches, or vampires, or they can address more realistic psychological fears. In Western literature the literary cultivation of fear and curiosity for its own sake began to emerge in the 18th-century pre-Romantic era with the Gothic novel. The genre was invented by Horace Walpole, whose Castle of Otranto (1765) may be said to have founded the horror story as a legitimate literary form. Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley introduced pseudoscience into the genre in her famous novel Frankenstein (1818), about the creation of a monster that ultimately destroys its creator.

In the Romantic era the German storyteller E.T.A. Hoffmann and the American Edgar Allan Poe raised the horror story to a level far above mere entertainment through their skillful intermingling of reason and madness, eerie atmosphere and everyday reality. They invested their spectres, doubles, and haunted houses with a psychological symbolism that gave their tales a haunting credibility.

The Gothic influence persisted throughout the 19th century in such works as Sheridan Le Fanu’s The House by the Churchyard and “Green Tea,” Wilkie Collins’s The Moonstone, and Bram Stoker’s vampire tale Dracula. The influence was revived in the 20th century by science-fiction and fantasy writers such as Mervyn Peake in his Gormenghast series. Other masters of the horror tale were Ambrose Bierce, Arthur Machen, Algernon Blackwood, H.P. Lovecraft, and Stephen King. Isolated masterpieces have been produced by writers not usually associated with the genre, such as Guy de Maupassant’s “Le Horla,” A.E. Coppard’s “Adam and Eve and Pinch Me,” Saki’s “Sredni Vashtar” and “The Open Window,” and W.F. Harvey’s “August Heat.” Some of the best-known horror stories owe their power to full-bodied characters that develop in realistic social environments and to the very absence of a mysterious atmosphere. In this category are Aleksandr Pushkin’s “The Queen of Spades” and W.W. Jacobs’s “The Monkey’s Paw.”

Amir.H.Ghazi